Defence Where can a dump cut to? by Dylan Freechild

There are four traditional “advantageous” places a dump can cut to:

1. Upline

This cut is made on an angle, downfield, from one side of the field
(break/open) to the other (open/break). At it’s best, this cut…

  • ends in the space downfield and in front of the disc
  • allows the dump to receive the disc facing downfield
  • gives the dump an opportunity to huck without a mark

2. Back-and-Away

This cut is made on an angle, usually after pushing
downfield but sometimes from a standstill, into the backfield space that is
traditionally not being as pressured as the upline space. At it’s best, this cut…

  • ends in the space laterally from the disc and doesn’t lose too many
    yards
  • allows the dump to receive the disc with their momentum moving
    laterally and facing downfield
  • changes the point of attack horizontally (~10+ yards)
  • gives the dump an opportunity to throw to the break space without a
    mark

Fig. 1: Typically, these first two options are seen when the dump is set up level with the disc.

We discuss this scenario in Guarding a Lateral Dump

3. Directly Downfield

This cut leverages the defenders positioning and simply cuts straight downfield (more often seen when dump is on the open side and set up 45 degrees backfield from the thrower). At it’s best, this cut…

  • ends downfield but laterally removed from the disc
  • allows the dump to receive the disc facing downfield
  • gives the dump an opportunity to throw anywhere without a mark

4. Directly Behind Thrower

This cut is made on a straight line horizontally
into the space directly behind the thrower. It’s the least threatening of the four
as far as a continuation throw is concerned but the most difficult to guard. It’s
meant usually to reset a high stall or to get the disc out of a cutter’s hands.

  • ends behind or a little beyond the thrower
  • allows the dump to receive the disc with their momentum moving into
    new horizontal space, thus changing the point of attack
  • gives the dump an opportunity to throw an unpressured continuation
    pass

Fig. 2: Typically, these latter options are seen when the dump is set up at an angle behind the disc on the open side.

We discuss this scenario in Guarding a Dump Behind

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